Met removes religious barrier

May 12, 2021

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Met removes religious barrierOn 1 May 2001 in Personnel Today AllMuslim women police officers will be allowed to wear traditional headscarves aspart of an initiative in London to boost recruitment from black and Asiancommunities. The Metropolitan Police is the first police force in the UK to permit the hijab.It is designing a black and white chequered headscarf to be worn by Muslimwomen officers. Mohamood Mahroof, of the Association of Muslim Police, said, “TheAssociation welcomes the Met’s decision to introduce the hijab as an item ofuniform for Muslim officers. This will now make Muslim women who do wear ahijab eligible to join the Met. “We hope many current and future officers will benefit from thechange.” Sikh officers are already allowed to wear turbans and the Met is consideringwhether to allow potential recruits from the Rastafarian community to havedreadlocks. The Home Office has instructed the Met to increase its number ofethnic minority officers from 4.1 per cent to 25 per cent by 2009. last_img read more

New order

May 12, 2021

first_img Previous Article Next Article As it strives to earn its strategic label, HR is beingsupplied with new analytical tools. But in order to assert itself in thisbusiness intelligence role, the profession needs to learn to use the softwareto its advantage. Keith Rodgers reportsIt is not often that a rank outsider emerges to take control of a majorslice of the IT industry but software firm Siebel Systems has done just that.Building from its roots in sales automation software, the company has come todominate the fast-growing customer relationship management field, forcingsoftware giants such as Oracle, SAP and Peoplesoft into a battle for secondplace. Siebel spotted a growth opportunity, grabbed it and, through adroitmarketing, won a dominant position. Siebel’s story is particularly relevant to human resources because thisyear, for the first time, it has turned its attention to the field of humancapital management. Although its current offerings are relatively rudimentary,especially when compared to the deep functionality offered by more establishedenterprise software suppliers, its vision is clear – within three years itbelieves HCM will be as big an application area as the customer relationsmanagement sector it services. While rivals and analysts alike have cast doubt on Siebel’s ability to playcatch-up in the HR sector without making acquisitions, its strategy underpins agrowing trend in both the IT industry and business at large. Historically, software providers have tended to compartmentalise theirapplications – building modules that focus on functional areas such as finance,HR, manufacturing and logistics. While developers such as SAP – which dominatedthese back-office areas in the 1990s – built enterprise-wide suites thatallowed easier integration between the modules, the functional mindsetreflected the management thinking of most companies. Organisations werestructured around largely self-contained departments, and softwareimplementations reflected that status quo. Today, however, these boundaries are being blurred. Customer management, forexample, was typically seen as a “front-office” activity, spanningsales, marketing and customer services. Now it is clear that finance plays akey role (particularly in measuring customer profitability) as does supplychain management – the processes that deliver the goods promised to customersby sales and marketing. Similarly, HR is being encouraged to move out of its process-oriented bunkerand get close to the heart of the enterprise, working at the cutting edge withline managers. The software industry has responded by focusing on improving theflow of data across organisational departments. As a result, three significant trends have emerged in IT HR. First,process-centric work, such as payroll and recruitment admin, is perceived asroutine in corporate eyes – even though many specialist applications arebecoming increasingly sophisticated and merit close attention. For mostorganisations, the more that can be automated the better, since this, intheory, frees up HR staff to do more strategic work. Second, in order to be strategic, HR needs new analytical tools to supportits decision-making and align its goals with corporate objectives. And thirdly,as the barriers between departments crumble, human capital-related decisionsare no longer the exclusive domain of HR, which means line managers requiretheir own HR-related analytics as well. Much of the IT industry’s focus, in terms of software, is delivering thiskind of business intelligence, both in toolsets that users can deploy to buildspecific applications, and in pre-packaged software products. In the human resources field, the leading vendors are rolling outsophisticated analytic applications ranging from cost measurement to predictivemodelling, most of them aimed at business users rather than technologyspecialists. In other departments, internally focused customer management applicationsare also helping organisations measure HCM competency and performance in areassuch as sales, marketing and customer service. It is still relatively early days – customer reference sites for the morerecent HR analytics applications are not easy to come by – but the businessbenefits are already starting to be proven. But to succeed with these tools, companies have to take an organisation-wideperspective of their business intelligence strategy, which has importantramifications for HR. In a recent report, From Strategy to Action: Linking Analytic andOperational Applications, industry analyst IDC warns that it is important toestablish an enterprise-wide foundation before tackling departmental analyticneeds. “The mistake organisations often make is to try to build anenterprise system by appropriating funds for separate analytic applications –first marketing, then supply chain optimisation, and so on. “But this is a risky strategy. Starting with process-specificapplications, rather than the framework, companies run the risk of acquiring aset of disconnected applications,” the report says. The logic of this argument is enforced when you consider the applicationsavailable. IDC identifies a hierarchy of three different types of analytics(see box) of which the second-tier – process or functional analytics – are themost immediately relevant to HR. Here, enterprise vendors such as Peoplesoft,Oracle, SAP, JD Edwards and Lawson, which provide the back-end HRMS engine forHR processes, are building a range of tools and applications to provide furtherintelligence to the HR function. Their suites – typically named as variations around the “WorkforceAnalytics” theme – allow for headcount planning, cost simulation andforecasting, employee turnover analysis, recruitment effectiveness,compensation planning and so forth, often reinforced with external benchmarkingdata. As well as the HRMS suppliers, traditional business intelligence specialistsare also playing for user mindshare in this space. SAS Institute, for example,provides a range of applications, including an HR-specific scorecard. Significantly, these suppliers are making big steps to extend HR analyticsbeyond its traditional boundaries. SAS is working with Saratoga Institute toroll out content roadmaps that put HR events into a wider business context,bringing the HR manager closer in thinking to line managers. Betty Silver, strategy manager for human capital solutions at SAS, pointsout, for example, that involuntary turnover is generally measured from an HRperspective in terms of the cost of hiring and training replacement staff. For a business manager, however, losing a key individual may be far morecritical if it means a product cannot be delivered on time. The roadmapsexamine possible outcomes from different scenarios, and in some cases offerremedies. These applications are complemented by a range of other process analyticsthat at first sight appear to be outside the remit of HR, but in fact relate toenterprise-wide human capital management. The biggest growth area for the analytics industry is CRM, and while many ofthe applications coming onto the market focus on areas such as customerprofitability, a number are geared to managing individual and departmentalperformance in areas such as sales, marketing and call centres. Because performance measurement is the foundation for employee management,HR can, and should be, playing a role in deploying them – particularly as manyof these applications will lead to fundamental shifts in the way employees aremanaged and compensated. Sales staff, for example, have traditionally beenmeasured on the revenue they bring in, rather than the net profit that thesales generate. Switching compensation to a value-based model, which may actively discourageemployees from selling favoured lines, is a major issue that requires skilledHR input. In practical terms, this means that many of the CRM analytics offeredby vendors such as Siebel, Peoplesoft, SAP and Oracle need to be considered aspart of an overall HCM analytics strategy. While these process analytics offer the most immediate benefit, it is IDC’stop tier – strategic analytics – that ultimately delivers most value at boardlevel, and which will potentially play a role in binding the HR function to theheart of a company’s activities. Both Peoplesoft and SAP are preparing tolaunch a range of planning tools in Q4 this year, which take theseenterprise-level analytics to their next stage. SAP will release an enterprisemanagement tool that looks not just at costing, but at skills deficiencies, andthen puts plans into effect to tackle them. Capability planning “People are now taking this more seriously,” says Mark O’Dowd,head of HR solutions at SAP UK. “It is not just about cost planning, it iscapability planning.” Peoplesoft, meanwhile, is preparing to unveil the third phase of its performancemanagement strategy. The first release focused on foundational information,using an enterprise warehouse as a data collection point and includingABM-style functionality. The second, introduced in January 2000, looked atoperational issues and decision support functionality in areas such as salesand HR, and incorporated balanced scorecard methodologies. According to Greg Wynne, director of product marketing for Peoplesoft’senterprise performance management division in the US, the next phase focuses onpredictive – or, more accurately, descriptive – modelling. As well as customer behaviour modelling and workforce planning, the suitewill include a business planning module, with a spreadsheet-style interfacewhich allows numerous users to collaborate around a centralised application. Itmeans, for example, that business managers can enter headcount assumptions intothe model, and the knock-on effect will immediately be apparent to othermanagers across the business. This linking of analytics with process begins to answer industry analysts’criticisms of many business intelligence applications – that they give usersvalid perspectives on their strategic goals and local activities, but don’tfeed back into the operational side to make changes on the back of them. As Stefan Rueter, director of business development in HCM at SAP’s Germanheadquarters, points out, “The pure display of information only solveshalf the problem. It comes down to the ability not just to get information, butto connect to business processes.” However, while these developments begin to address some of the shortcomingsof the HR analytics market, there is still some way to go. What do you measure? AMR Research analyst Monica Barron argues that most organisations have stillto break out of the mould of measuring cost and transaction. While it makessense to measure, for example, the cost of hiring replacement staff, whatcompanies are not doing is measuring the value of the human capital they havehired. “HR people love benchmarks and metrics – it is relatively scientific.But when you start talking about how much value do I bring? Am I worth mysalary and benefits? You need to think of other metrics to make sure people arecontributing. Companies should be doing this on a constant basis,” Barronsays. That process is difficult, since each organisation is unique. Silver at SAS Institute believes it may not be possible to produce cannedapplications that capture all this data generically. Most likely, vendors like SAS will produce a range of pre-packagedapplications and metrics that give multi-dimensional analysis of the mostsignificant fundamentals for HR managers, while more sophisticated data-miningtechniques will be applied by high-end technical staff. Ultimately, the success of all of these initiatives lies in HR’s hands andits willingness to embrace analytics – not just across other functionalactivities, but of its own performance. Enterprise performance management is the glue that bonds differentfunctional processes into one cohesive strategy: given that people underpinevery aspect of corporate activity, there is a central role waiting for HR itif chooses to grab it. Software that helps managers to manage their departmentMore sophisticated software has handed non-IT managers the tools toundertake their own analysis of how their department is runningThe emergence of human resources analytics has been fuelled by a fundamentalshift in the business intelligence community. Historically, businessintelligence tools have been highly complex, designed to be used either byskilled IT practitioners or, in the case of executive information systems,aimed at senior managers. While some of the more sophisticated analytical tools available stillrequire a large degree of IT or statistical proficiency, the emphasis is onbringing business intelligence to the masses. Not only does this empower linemanagers to undertake their own departmental analysis, it also allows companiesto spread understanding of – and responsibility for – performance throughoutthe enterprise. Industry analyst IDC breaks the analytical software market into three tiers:Strategic analytic applications These define corporate goals, using familiar methodologies such as thebalanced scorecard, and provide feedback both to senior and line-of-businessmanagers on whether the company is hitting its targets.Process-specific applicationsDesigned to measure and plan specific activities, including HR activitiessuch as recruitment and training.Foundational analyticsThe core measurement techniques are used across the company and giveconsistency to all analytical activities. They include activity-basedmanagement and a methodology for allocating costs to establish the trueprofitability of individual activities. These applications feed from a common data store which extracts data fromrelevant departments, cleans it and provides raw information for analysis. Theearly days were dogged by high failure rates, usually because projects were toocomplex. Vendors and service companies have become more adept at managing theseimplementations, and the number of success stories has risen fast. Enterprisesoftware suppliers now have well-established data warehousing strategies thatunderpin their business intelligence strategies. Related posts:No related photos. New orderOn 11 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

Can HR be bothered to change its ways?

May 12, 2021

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Can HR be bothered to change its ways?On 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Most businesses recognise that the creation of sustainable wealth is nowcreated by intangible assets like knowledge, intellectual property,relationships, brands and innovation. The measurement and management of theseintangible assets is difficult but provides people professionals for the firsttime with the opportunity to be the creators of competitive advantage. Thequestion is can HR be bothered? Tomorrow’s successful organisations will take an offensive approach to usingtalent, creativity and people-led strategy development, not because it is agood thing in itself, but because it will create clear space between them andtheir competitors. At Qtab we have felt this defensive mindset to be prevalent within the HRcommunity, so we undertook some research. The results are scathing. Less than10 per cent of the organisations asked are measuring their human capital, withonly 25 per cent able to identify their organisation’s wealth creators. Only 20per cent had a defined and well thought out employer brand. Research being carried out by a number of academic institutions in the UKinto HR’s impact on organisation performance seems to indicate a relationshipbetween having an HR function and superior business performance. The reason may be that the majority of HR activity is focused on improvingwhat Michael Porter calls “operational effectiveness” – doing thingsbetter than competitors. In people terms this could include having betterperformance management, more progressive reward systems, better people managersand more effective internal communication. When speaking at a recent conference on intellectual capital the audiencewas made up of accountants, IT professionals and knowledge officers. Thefinancial professionals are looking at methods of measuring thesepeople-centric assets and how these non-physical assets make an impact onfuture business performance. Knowledge officers are developing new ways of enhancing organisationallearning. IT staff are developing ideas and processes around the capture andsharing of knowledge. We can give up the development of people strategy tothese other professionals, or focus on assisting our organisations to thinkdifferently. The evidence seems to indicate that the thinking and the tools to help usmeasure and develop these intangible assets exist but people professionalsdon’t have the confidence, willingness or capability to use them. Do we go outside our comfort zones, learn new skills, push ourselves todevelop new measurement frameworks and try, with our intellect and stamina, tocreate people strategies altering how our business compete? I am not yetconvinced many in the profession can be bothered. last_img read more

Staff push for flexible working

May 12, 2021

first_imgStaff push for flexible workingOn 19 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. The increasingly flexible approach of employers to working hours is beingdriven by concerns over the retention of skilled staff and the need to keep upwith competitors, a new study claims. Research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation on Scottish companies in thefinancial services sector shows that new legislation covering parental leaveand work-life balance has persuaded staff to push for flexible workingarrangements. However, the study claims that flexible arrangements are often left to thediscretion of line managers, who can be inconsistent in their approach. Jeff Hyman, professor of HR management at Glasgow Caledonian University andco-author of the report, said the Government needs to monitor the effectivenessof its voluntary approach of promoting family friendly policies. He said: “Our study shows that company policies are currently dictatedby business interests rather than family concerns. “Family-friendly employment also means different things to differentpeople, which makes it difficult to reach voluntary agreement about the termsof a formal policy.” The research into 17 companies shows there is a wider spread of flexibleworking policy initiatives in firms where trades unions are recognised. It alsofound there was an absence of women in senior management in companies with noformal policies. The ability of managers to offer flexible working to staff depends on timeconstraints on the employee’s workload and availability of a substitute worker,the study concludes. www.jrf.org.uk Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Employers missing message over sickness records

May 12, 2021

first_imgFears that employers will need individual employees’ permission to keeptheir sickness records are largely unfounded, experts claim. The latest instalment of the code of practice on data protection, releasedlast month, caused concern by stating that sickness records, as opposed toabsence records, were “sensitive personal data” under the DataProtection Act 1998 and therefore subject to strict conditions on use. The Act allows employers to keep such data without obtaining consenthowever, if it is necessary for them to comply with legal requirements. “This is definitely something that has been missed,” said DianeSinclair, lead adviser on public policy at the CIPD. “Keeping sicknessrecords to meet regulatory requirements in relation to SSP or disabilitydiscrimination, for example, is allowed.” The records management code itself makes clear that keeping records toensure staff are not dismissed unfairly for absences is also permissiblewithout consent. “Though the Act itself does not put it beyond doubt, this final codeputs out the very clear message that as long as employers keep and use sicknessrecords in a reasonable manner, they can justify this in terms of their legalobligations and will not need individual consent,” said Lucy Baldwinson,professional support lawyer at Allen & Overy. The Lord Chancellor is now planning amendments to the DPA to close the gapbetween statute and practice. Implementation of the code will prove to be a huge administrative burden onHR because most employers will need to completely overhaul their absencemanagement systems, Sinclair warned. “We are not entirely happy about theseparation between personal and sensitive personal data,” she said. “This practice may already exist in some companies where occupationalhealth departments know why a staff member is off sick, while the HR team onlyknow how long they have been absent. “But many companies will need to change their practices.” Warren Wayne, partner at Boodle Hatfield, advised employers to keep sicknessrecords and absence records absolutely separate. For sick pay purposes, forexample, payroll needs access only to absence records, not the reasons forabsence. “Managers should be permitted to have access to sickness records sothey can investigate persistent short-term illness or long-term illness absenceissues. This information should only be available to those who reasonablyrequire it as part of their duties (including HR departments),” he added. Find out more on Employment Practices Data Protection CodePart 2 at www.dataprotection.gov.ukWhat does the code say?– Distinguish between sickness data,which is “sensitive”, and absence data, which is not– Ensure keeping sickness records can be justified by referencetoat least one of sensitive personal data conditions in DPA (see page 53 ofcode)– Devise separate systems for sickness and absence records andrestrict access to sickness records on a need-to-know basis– Conduct risk analyses when deciding whether to keep data on staffand for how long– Provide workers with an annual copy of their basic employmentrecord– Eliminate irrelevant or excessive data from files on a regularbasis– Incorporate confidentiality clauses into employees’ contractsof employment– Establish procedures and rules for removing staff recordsfrom systems Employers missing message over sickness recordsOn 1 Oct 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

Quality of content still a problem

May 12, 2021

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Quality of content still a problemOn 1 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Forty-five per cent of companies do not believe their investment ine-learning has been a success, according to research by internationale-learning consultancy ICUS. Respondents cited two factors for the lack of success: the perceived lack ofgood-quality customised content (highlighted by one in three respondents) andlearning without interaction to stimulate learners. The latter highlights the importance of collaborative learning and was inline with the view from many of the respondents that online participation withfellow learners via forums and e-mail leads to higher completion rates fore-learning courses. More than one in three of the 275 HR decision-makers polled thought this wasimportant in terms of promoting knowledge sharing among e-learners, while onein three felt interactivity motivates learners. “This survey provides a reality check. It is clear that as companieslearn from the (sometimes) painful experience of implementing e-learning, thatthey increasingly value customised content,” said Christiaan Heyning,general manager of ICUS UK. “This trend converges with another that we frequently encounter in ourwork for blue-chip clients – the increased focus on knowledge management. Byoffering easy-to-access, relevant content and linking it with in-companyexperts, you effectively merge e-learning with knowledge management,” saidHeyning. www.icus.net Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Presenting problems

May 12, 2021

first_imgPresenting problemsOn 1 Feb 2003 in Personnel Today When it comes to public speaking, most people – including nurses – arefilled with dread. But with the right training giving a presentation needn’t bea fear-inducing experience, by Linda Caren I hate heights. I once had to be carried off the Coca-Cola Roller Coaster atthe Glasgow Garden Festival in 1990, having lost all dignity and the power ofmy legs. As for public speaking, just the thought of it produces the kind ofrapid weight loss Dr Atkins could only dream about. Both activities can get mehyperventilating for Scotland. So why get involved in either? It’s thechallenge. In my case, it’s that self-doubting inner voice that says, “So…you think you’re a big girl? Let’s see if you’re really up to this one.” I hear this voice a lot now I’m the wrong side of 40, so when I recentlyreceived a telephone call from a friend asking me if I’d like to speak at an OHstudy day in Ayrshire, I heard the gauntlet strike the floor. So, instead ofreplying honestly “No, in fact I’d rather stick pins in my eyes”, Iagreed. Now, I do think Mark Twain said it best, “There are two types ofspeakers: those who are nervous and those that are liars”. Fear of speaking in public is listed as the number one fear of all fears,1 deathbeing number seven. I asked Carol Bannister, the RCN’s occupational health spokeswoman what shethought might put nurses off presenting at conference level. “Time constraints mainly. Most nurses are already too busy in theirworking lives to devote the amount of time required to preparing a paper forpresentation. That, and the fact that a lot of nurses simply don’t feel thatwhat they do is innovative enough for people to want to listen to, and they arevery experienced, very highly educated people… nervousness is a factor ofcourse, especially for novice speakers. I remember seeing one delegateliterally tremble from head to toe prior to presenting at her first nationalconference. She regularly speaks very successfully at international level now. Fearis something that will subside with practice.” How do we get that practice? The RCN offers study days and workshops designed to help nurses preparethemselves and their papers for presentation. These events are free, butgenerally very poorly attended. OH education courses do provide the opportunityfor practitioners to present to fellow students, but that might be a one-offperformance and may not provide the crucial, one-to-one, detailed feedbackneeded to polish a performance to a professional standard. There are frequent opportunities to raise the OH profile in the workplace. Ispoke to 20 OHNs working across Scotland’s central belt. Sixty per cent regularly trained or presented to groups of employees,including management. The range was impressive. From toolbox talks to small groups on sharpsinjuries and blood-borne viruses, travel health, skin-care programmes,prevention of occupational asthma, manual handling programmes, hearingconservation and first aid training/scenarios, to corporate inductionprogrammes, maximising attendance at work presentations, and in some cases,presenting the service to a potential customer. Great opportunities to practice, but only 25 per cent of the nurses I spoketo reported this as being an enjoyable experience. The lack of feedback made itdifficult for the nurses to assess whether or not the presentation or traininghad been understood, or had made any positive difference to the workingpractice within the company. Considering that many of us – particularly those working for localauthorities or within the NHS – have very large numbers of employees to reachand have to manage with limited resources, it doesn’t make sense to miss anyopportunity to address groups in large numbers, while making sure our effortsare effective. In order to share ideas, knowledge and opinion as widely as we can, speakingor writing in the public arena 2 is very necessary and we will be moreeffective if we can convey a passion for what we do. Why learn to present? How nurses present themselves (both physically and verbally) can affect thesuccess of their overall message. We know from Mehrabian’s3 research that the impact and perceived sincerityof any communication is primarily body language, at 55 per cent. The sound ofthe communication or voice quality accounts for 38 per cent, the wordsthemselves only 7 per cent. In communication, where there is disharmony between the words and the bodylanguage, the listener pays attention to the non-verbal part of thecommunication4. So if how you look and how you sound accounts for 93 per cent of yourcommunication, it might be reasonable to assume that most of us would benefitfrom some professional help to try to ensure our presentation skills complementthe message we intend to convey. Presentation training Within AHS, (see box on p18) our training and developmentconsultant/business coach, Margaret Rose was tasked to address this issue.Members of our multi-disciplinary team, OH advisers, OH physicians,occupational hygienists and our ergonomist have attended her three-day trainingprogramme, alongside delegates who were also our customers. This gave us theopportunity to strengthen relations with our clients and market the role of OHwithin the workplace. On successful completion we were awarded the nationally-recognised CharteredInstitute of Environmental Health’s (CIEH) professional trainer’s certificate. The course included sessions on: – Accelerated learning, learning styles and group dynamics – Structuring, writing and reviewing objectives – Planning and structuring the three phases of an interactive trainingsession using buzz-maps/thought showers – Question technique – Visual and kinaesthetic learning aids5 – The skill of giving and receiving structured feedback to develop learning Most importantly, the critical part of the coursework was to deliver twotraining sessions to the other members – no previously prepared pieces of workwere permitted – the first lasting 30 minutes, the second assessment lasting 45minutes. The sessions were both videoed to allow the class to see how potentialbarriers such as irritating mannerisms, unnecessary hand gestures, andphysical/verbal tics (see Figure 1) can distract an audience from getting thepoint of the presentation. Although uncomfortable at first, the camera was almost immediately forgottenand proved an invaluable tool by allowing us to see how an audience mightperceive us. Margaret Rose’s formula for success is: “200 per cent preparation to achieve a 90 per cent delivery. You can’tprepare enough and on reflection, there’s room for improvement everytime.” Our first attempt proved that old habits die hard, and remaining in ourcomfort zones we produced – Slide shows – as opposed to training sessions – Word-for-word reading of notes delivered in a monotone (a read intro is adead intro) – Boring, cramped, overhead slides in small type, complete with spellingmistakes – Abandoning of notes part way through and ‘winging’ the rest of it – Failing to anticipate the needs of the audience – completely – Asking closed questions Most people feel nervous before speaking to a group of people, butnervousness in itself isn’t a bad thing as it allows the adrenaline to flow andcontributes to a better performance. The aim is to get the balance right so asto appear as a good speaker even if you are quaking inside. The secret lies in good preparation of yourself After delivering the second training presentation and feedback sessions, wecould see how steep our learning curve had been in achieving the requiredstandards. The resulting training sessions from my colleagues were reallyenjoyable, enlightening and informative. As for my presentation at the nursing study day, I was still horriblynervous, but without the rapid weight loss this time. I remain indebted to allmy friends and colleagues who conspired to turn me into an ‘expert’ for theoccasion, to the veteran speakers at the event who were unbelievably generousin their support of me, and also the Ayrshire Occupational Health Nurses Groupwho organised a fantastic day and gave me the opportunity to further practiceand develop my presentation skills. Conclusion Professional presentation skills training will provide you with the tools topackage OH recommendations in the most appropriate way to your management team.Not only will effective communication enhance your professional status but itwill also ensure the appropriate delivery of OH care. Linda Caren MA, BScCN (OH), RGN, RM has been an OH adviser for AssociatedHealth Specialists for five years. Her customers include local authorities, theexplosives industry, electronics and food packaging. References1. Wallechinky D (1993) The Book of Lists Little Brown & CoISBN 03169207972. Hadfield-Law L (2001) Presentation skills for nurses: How toprepare more effectively. British Journal of Nursing October 11-24; 10(18):1208-93. Mehrabian A (1972) Non verbal communication, Chicago: AldineAtherton. 4. O’Connor J, Seymour J (1994). Presentation skills trainingwith NLP p86 Thorsons London5. Rose C , Nicholl MJ (1998). Acquiring the Information pp 91-96 Accelerated Learning for the 21st Century, Dell, New YorkTop 10 annoying habits (% annoyed)Interruptingwhile others are talking                                                       88Swearing                                                                                              84Mumbling or talking too softly                                                              80Talking too loudly                                                                                73Monotonous, boring voice                                                                   73Using filler words (um, you know…)                                                     69A nasal whine                                                                                      67Talking too fast                                                                                    66Using poor grammar or mispronouncing words                                      63A high pitched voice                                                                            61Associated Health SpecialistsAssociated Health Specialists (AHS)is a multi-disciplinary occupational health consultancy offering services thatcover the whole of Scotland and the North of England.Main industry sectors include shipbuilding, local authority,electronics and semi-conductors, light and heavy engineering, waste management,pharmaceuticals, financial services, NHS trusts, explosive industries andcatering. The majority of customers are medium – large mainly blue chipcompanies.The multidisciplinary team comprises:– Occupational medicine– Occupational hygiene– Training and development– Human factors/ergonomicsA training and development consultant works with AHS employeesand external customers to cover training requirements as part of an overallpackage of services, training on a group basis or individual (one-to-one)coaching. Where clients have in-house training resources, AHS can provideadditional training support to ensure in-house trainers have appropriate skillsto train and to ensure conformity between personnel and departments. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

Temps

May 12, 2021

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Short-sighted employers are set to waste £500m by failing to extend thecontracts of temporary workers. Research by IT services and training company Parity reveals that in a bid tocut costs, firms are agreeing shorter contracts for temporary staff – but areactually setting themselves up to lose out in the long-term. Based on more than 2,000 temporary contracts over the past year, the studyfinds the UK’s million-plus temporary workforce is now being offeredthree-month contracts on average, compared with five-month terms in 2001. This is the result of businesses trying to reduce their initial investmentin contract workers. Parity predicts this short-sighted policy could leave UK firms spending anunnecessary £500m this year, as it costs up to £1,000 to source and recruit anew temporary worker, and an outlay of £50 to extend a contract. Rick Bacon, managing director at Parity, said the extra expenditure alonefor extending three-month short-term contracts will cost companies more than£100m each year. On top of this, employers will also have to engage in rate renegotiationsmore frequently, which will result in further spend. TempsOn 8 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

Case round up

May 12, 2021

first_imgCase round upOn 1 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. This week’s case round-up by Eversheds 020 7919 4500Don’t want to talk about it? X v Y, EAT,765/02, [11 June 2003] The extent to which a person’s private life spills over into their workinglife has always been a difficult issue for employers. X, whose identity was protected, worked for a charitable organisationassisting young offenders. Outside of work he was arrested for an offence ofgross indecency, but did not disclose the incident or his subsequent caution tohis employer. When his employer found out about the incident, X was suspendedand then dismissed from work altogether for gross misconduct. His employer claimed X was in breach of his duty of trust and confidence byfailing to disclose the incident, and that his conduct had fundamentallydamaged the employment relationship and might bring the employer into seriousdisrepute. X’s claim for unfair dismissal and for breach of his right to respect forhis private and family life under Article 8 Human Rights Act 1998 was dismissedby the EAT, as was his appeal. The employment appeal tribunal considered the inter-relationship between unfairdismissal law and the effect of the Human Rights Act. It held that Article 8would only apply to incidents that could properly be described as ‘private’,whereas this offence had taken place in public. It also found that the employer’s decision to dismiss X was reasonable inall the circumstances, given the nature of X’s job and the fact that he had notdisclosed the incident. In this case, his conduct in his private life could notbe ignored in the workplace. Reasonable time off for public duties C Riley-Williams v Argos Ltd, EAT, 29 [May 2003] Ms Riley-Williams, employed by Argos, was appointed as a magistrate. In thatcapacity, she was required to sit for 13 days each year. Section 50 Employment Rights Act (ERA) 1996 provides a statutory right totime off work for the performance of public duties. Having asked Argos about taking unpaid time off work, however,Riley-Williams was told she could take five days’ unpaid leave. The remainingeight days of her duties would have to be taken out of her annual holidayentitlement. She resigned, claiming constructive unfair dismissal and breach ofstatutory rights. The tribunal held that Argos had allowed Riley-Williams a reasonable amountof time off working during work hours for the performance of her duties as amagistrate. Accordingly, it held that she had not been constructively dismissedby reason of asserting a statutory right to time off (section 50 ERA 1996).Riley-Williams successfully appealed. The EAT found that by looking at whether Ms Riley-Williams was in factprevented from taking time off work, the tribunal had asked itself the wrongquestion. It had failed to have proper regard for Section 50(4) ERA 1996, which setsout relevant considerations such as what a particular office or role mightreasonably require, and the needs of the employer’s business. What was areasonable amount of time off work for public duties should be assessedobjectively with reference to these factors. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

HR Hartley

May 12, 2021

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. The age-old battle for equality goes onI have a large file on my desk marked ‘equality’. Currently, I am working myway through it to ensure my organisation is ready to comply with the lawsgoverning all forms of discrimination. So far, I am happy to say I haven’t discovered any huge discrepancies of paybetween the genders – but then I am only a quarter of the way through the file.It is a hard slog, despite my belief in equal rights. So I took a night off tovisit the Queen’s theatre in London. On the advice of a Personnel Today journalist – the one who calls me at oneminute to noon every Monday to harangue me for my column – I saw a play calledThe Tamer Tamed. It was written by a man called John Fletcher (1579 – 1625)about 20 years after The Taming of the Shrew. Penned as a sequel and with theblessing of Shakespeare himself, Fletcher charts the second marriage of thecentral male character Petruchio (his first wife died after he brought her toheel). Petruchio is reduced from a beer-swilling, arrogant pig into a doting,empathetic husband after Wife Two decides she is simply not putting up with hissexist behaviour. In desperation, he fakes symptoms of the plague, but sheoutwits him, sparks a small but powerful women’s revolt and comes outvictorious. Extraordinary, but also utterly shameful for today’s society that a playwritten in the 17th century virtually airs line by line the same equalitydebate that still rages on today. Pay inequities, for example, remain a particular problem. But how manyorganisations are doing something about it? Not many, I’ll bet. By now youshould be conducting equal pay audits, not simply ignoring the whole issuebecause it’s just too big to face up to, and your board can’t work out how tomake the books balance if you discover some huge shortfalls. C’mon HR: this is a call to arms. It’s up to us to champion equal pay onceand for all. Are you on board? Hartley, our new weekly columnist with strong opinion, is an HR directorat large HR HartleyOn 24 Feb 2004 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more