Artifacts discovered in survey

first_img Archaeologists found two areas that contain significant artifacts. The lower site will be preserved in perpetuity, and artifacts are being collected from the upper site, a terrace above the riverbed. The survey area comprises fewer than 10 acres of the 695-acre site. Adamick said the items will be given to the Santa Clarita Historical Society. Senior planner Jeff Hogan, who is overseeing the project for the city, said he had not yet been advised of the find, but he said it was not a surprise. The approximate five-week survey process has been under way for two weeks. Along with the archaeologist, tribal monitors from three American Indian groups are overseeing the survey process. Monitors help identify historically significant areas and protect discoveries from harm. They represent tribal interests and serve as liaisons among tribes, the city and the developers. The Tatavium inhabited the Santa Clarita Valley hundreds, and possibly thousands, of years ago. Some groups lived in the area year-round. They hunted small animals and gathered yucca, acorns and berries. Santa Clarita City Council members approved the Riverpark project, but a cadre of environmental groups that say officials gave short shrift to air quality and floodplain issues filed a lawsuit against the project in Los Angeles Superior Court. The project is under way. Adamick said the courts could halt the project if a judge issues an injunction or restraining order, but none has been requested. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!,SANTA CLARITA – An archaeologist hired by developer Newhall Land to survey the Riverpark site has found artifacts left by American Indians who once lived in what is now the center of town. Grinding stones and arrowhead fragments that likely were used by members of the Tatavium tribe hundreds of years ago were found adjacent to where the extension of Newhall Ranch Road will be built, said Carol Maglione, assistant vice president for community programs for The Newhall Land and Farming Company. “We had anticipated this was an area that had potential for (artifacts) before the (environmental report) was released to the public, before the public hearings,” said Glen Adamick, vice president of forward planning and entitlements for the developer. The 1,089-home Riverpark development is planned on the property at the eastern end of Newhall Ranch Road, north of the Santa Clara River. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Archaeologists found two areas that contain significant artifacts. The lower site will be preserved in perpetuity, and artifacts are being collected from the upper site, a terrace above the riverbed. The survey area comprises fewer than 10 acres of the 695-acre site. Adamick said the items will be given to the Santa Clarita Historical Society. Senior planner Jeff Hogan, who is overseeing the project for the city, said he had not yet been advised of the find, but he said it was not a surprise. The approximate five-week survey process has been under way for two weeks. Along with the archaeologist, tribal monitors from three American Indian groups are overseeing the survey process. Monitors help identify historically significant areas and protect discoveries from harm. They represent tribal interests and serve as liaisons among tribes, the city and the developers. The Tatavium inhabited the Santa Clarita Valley hundreds, and possibly thousands, of years ago. Some groups lived in the area year-round. They hunted small animals and gathered yucca, acorns and berries. Santa Clarita City Council members approved the Riverpark project, but a cadre of environmental groups that say officials gave short shrift to air quality and floodplain issues filed a lawsuit against the project in Los Angeles Superior Court. SANTA CLARITA – An archaeologist hired by developer Newhall Land to survey the Riverpark site has found artifacts left by American Indians who once lived in what is now the center of town. Grinding stones and arrowhead fragments that likely were used by members of the Tatavium tribe hundreds of years ago were found adjacent to where the extension of Newhall Ranch Road will be built, said Carol Maglione, assistant vice president for community programs for The Newhall Land and Farming Company. “We had anticipated this was an area that had potential for (artifacts) before the (environmental report) was released to the public, before the public hearings,” said Glen Adamick, vice president of forward planning and entitlements for the developer. The 1,089-home Riverpark development is planned on the property at the eastern end of Newhall Ranch Road, north of the Santa Clara River. The project is under way. Adamick said the courts could halt the project if a judge issues an injunction or restraining order, but none has been requested. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. 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