Holiday Market coming to Howard Park in December

April 20, 2021

first_img WhatsApp (Photo supplied/City of South Bend) A new Holiday Market is coming to Howard Park. The festive marketplace will bring together local makers, entrepreneurs and artists offering their work for sale.The City of South Bend released the following information:South Bend Venues Parks & Arts is excited to announce a brand-new, free event December 3-5, 10-12 and 17-19 at the Howard Park Inovateus Solar Event Lawn. The Howard Holiday Market will bring a unique and festive marketplace to the heart of the East Bank at Howard Park, inviting the local community of makers, entrepreneurs and artists to offer uniquely curated goods.“In a time when it’s difficult to host events, we wanted to bring some magic to winter and encourage our community to celebrate the most wonderful time of the year,” said Annie Smith, SBVPA’s Chief Development Officer. “We hope everyone is able to make new memories with us heading into this spirited season.”Vendors interested in participating in this years’ market are invited to apply online at visithowardpark.com/market. A limited number of vendors will be permitted each week, allowing for distancing to take place. Applications close November 12, 2020.  The Howard Holiday Market plans to follow all safety guidelines in accordance with the CDC and guidance from the St. Joseph County Health Department, including capacity limits. A detailed precaution plan will be soon available. Learn more about the market at visithowardpark.com/holidaymarket. Facebook Google+ Holiday Market coming to Howard Park in December Pinterest By Jon Zimney – November 2, 2020 0 375 Google+ Twitter Facebook Pinterest IndianaLocalNews Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleThree family members killed in fire in Benton HarborNext articleEarly voting ends at 12 p.m. Monday Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

GM recalling 10,000 Chevy and GMC vans due to fire risk

April 20, 2021

first_img Previous articleTippecanoe woman killed in crash near BurketNext articleShooting in South Bend kills one, injures two Thursday morning Brooklyne Beatty Google+ Facebook Pinterest By Brooklyne Beatty – April 1, 2021 0 254 TAGSChevrolet Expressfire riskgmGMC Savanarecallshort circuitvan (95.3 MNC) General Motors is recalling more than 10,000 vans due to a fire risk.Almost 8,000 2021 Chevrolet Express and more than 2,000 2021 GMC Savana vehicles are being recalled.GM reports the recall is related to a short circuit issue, which can cause the battery to die or cause a fire under the hood.Only vehicles built on or prior to December 7, 2020 are affected.To check if your vehicle is under the recall, click here. WhatsApp IndianaLocalMichiganNationalcenter_img Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Facebook GM recalling 10,000 Chevy and GMC vans due to fire risk Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

Press release: Plymouth trio banned from waste trade for fly-tipping around Cornwall

April 20, 2021

first_imgThree men from the Plymouth area have been banned from the waste trade for fly-tipping in Cornish beauty spots.Wayne Plummer, of Burrator Avenue, Princetown, Ashley Brown, of Tollox Place, Plymouth and Michael Baggally, of Wolseley Road, Plymouth, were all given Community Orders requiring 100 hours of work after admitting the illegal deposit of household, industrial and commercial waste and not being registered waste carriers.They dumped waste, including old sofas and carpets, in scenic locations, even setting fire to it on one occasion.All 3 were ordered to pay £520 compensation and given a Criminal Behaviour Order for 5 years, preventing them from being involved in the waste business.Baggallay, who had his hearing for sentencing adjourned pending a mental health assessment to establish his fitness for work, appeared at Plymouth Magistrates Court on Monday 23 April 2018. Plummer and Brown were both sentenced on 10 April 2018.The prosecution followed a joint investigation between the Environment Agency, which took the lead role, South Hams Council, Plymouth City Council, Cornwall Council and Devon and Cornwall Police.A spokesperson for the Environment Agency, said: I’m delighted that we’ve been able to work with the Environment Agency and other local authorities to secure a conviction in this instance. I hope this sends a message that fly-tipping will absolutely not be tolerated, and we will prosecute offenders. A spokesperson for South Hams District Council, where some of the waste was tipped, said: This criminal behaviour was premeditated and planned and the environmentally-sensitive locations were chosen by the defendants for their remoteness in order to better escape detection. On 2 November 2016, Cornwall Council was alerted to fly-tipping in the car park at Cremyll on the Rame Peninsula that included sofas and carpets. Further offences followed in January 2017 at Little Lane in Bovisand and two days later near Torpoint.The final offence happened at Hooe Road in Plymstock when waste was dumped on a public footpath and set on fire. Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue attended.Evidence found at 3 sites linked the waste to all 3 men. The total clean-up cost was more than £5,000.Note to the Editor:Businesses and members of the public have a duty of care to ensure that their waste is properly dealt with. They should always check that the company removing their waste is registered as a waste carrier and ask for evidence it will be properly dealt with. Always ask for a receipt. If a waste collection company can’t satisfy you on this, don’t employ them. These simple steps can stop fly-tippers in their tracks.last_img read more

Speech: PM speech at NHS 70 reception: 4 July 2018

April 20, 2021

first_imgI am delighted to welcome you all to Downing Street to help mark what is a very special birthday of a very special institution.In my line of work there are not many ideas from 70 years ago that are unquestionably supported today, but that is undoubtedly the case with our National Health Service.In a world that has changed almost beyond recognition, the vision at the heart of the NHS – of a tax-funded service that is available to all, free at the point of use with care based on clinical need and not the ability to pay – still retains near-universal acceptance.And that tells us a lot.Not just about the principles behind the NHS, powerful though they are.But also about the people who, for 70 years, have turned those principles into practice on daily basis.People like you.There are the doctors, nurses, midwives and all the other health professionals on the front line – and the staff who support them, from porters to ward clerks to receptionists.Across the country there are thousands of GPs, dentists, optometrists and others providing care under the NHS umbrella.Then there are the patient advocacy groups, the volunteers, the researchers…Many of you here today have been a part of the NHS family for 40 years or more.That’s an amazing achievement, and I know Jeremy – a man who knows a lot about long service – will be presenting you with commemorative badges to mark that later this evening.Others among you are, through your innovations, shaping the future of the NHS and of healthcare itself.Some of you are just setting out on what I hope will be long and rewarding careers.Yet all of you share one common trait.Every day, you get up and go to work so the NHS can continue to do what it has done every day for 70 years – provide the British people with some of the best healthcare in the world.I want that to continue.But for that to happen we must recognise that the NHS conceived by the likes of Beveridge, Willink and Bevan was created to serve a very different country in a very different time.Today, thanks to the NHS, people are living longer – but that brings with it an increase in dementia and other conditions associated with old age.Childhood obesity risks burdening the next generation with a lifetime of ill-health.And our understanding of mental health has progressed significantly – it can no longer be treated as somehow “less serious” than physical ailments.The NHS of yesterday was simply not designed or equipped to deal with these kind of issues.The NHS of tomorrow must be.That’s why, last month, I set out the priorities that will guide our long-term plan for the future of our NHS.A plan that will put the NHS on a sustainable path for generations to come.At its heart is new investment: an extra £394 million per week in real terms by 2023/24.But, important though that is, we all know that good healthcare is about more than money.So I have asked the NHS itself to draw up a 10-year plan to make sure every penny of the new funding is well-spent, and that leaders are accountable for delivery.Frontline staff like you will be involved in the plan’s development, so it delivers for patients and for the Health Service.I know that you got into medicine and healthcare because you want to make a difference, you want to help people get better or manage their conditions.Yet too often we see bureaucracy getting in the way of care, with process being put before patients.So the plan will highlight what changes we could make so that you can concentrate on putting patients first.I know that there is fantastic, innovative work going on right across the country.That the answers to many of the challenges we face can already be found in the best of what the NHS does today, for example in bringing different teams together to provide care closer to home.So the plan will make it easier to share this best practice, letting everyone learn from what works and avoid what doesn’t.I know that your dedication to your work is total.But I also know that, sometimes, you can be frustrated by staff shortages, and that you rarely enjoy the flexibility or work/life balance that many people now take for granted.We have already removed the cap on the number of foreign doctors and nurses who can come here each year, to relieve some of the immediate pressure on staff numbers.The plan will go further, investing in the workforce and introducing modern working practices so that the NHS is not just one of the biggest employers in the world, but also one of the best – managed in a way that works for patients and staff alike.Finally, I know that those of you who have worked in the NHS for many years will have already seen enormous changes in medicine.In the past 40 years alone we’ve heralded the arrival of synthetic human insulin, IVF and the HPV vaccine.More change is coming.As we stand here today, scientists are working to harness the power of genomics, Artificial Intelligence and more.Healthcare does not stand still – and nor should the NHS.So the plan will help the Health Service embrace the technology of tomorrow so it is fit to face the challenges of the future.Everyone in this garden, everyone in No 10, everyone in this city and beyond will have their own story of what the NHS has done for them.And that’s because it’s not the Labour Health Service or the Conservative Health Service – it is the NATIONAL Health Service.It belongs to all of us.It is there for all of us.For 70 years it has been a great British achievement of which we can all be proud.In the years to come I want to make it greater still.And, whether you are just starting out or have already given a lifetime of service, I look forward to working with you to make that happen.last_img read more

Press release: Sunshine lights up A38 in East Midlands

April 20, 2021

first_img We’re always looking for new ways to further improve journeys and safety for drivers and this is a great example of that. This section of carriageway has no street lighting so the solar road studs and improved lane markings make a real difference. At the same time the new technology is more durable, meaning less disruption for motorists in the long term thanks to fewer roadworks. Standard road studs require car headlights to illuminate their reflective surface – typically this means that the headlights can be seen up to 90 metres away, giving drivers travelling at 60mph around three seconds to react to conditions on the road.The new road studs are powered by solar energy, with a panel absorbing power during the day. Throughout the night they generate their own light through a battery powered LED and can be seen up to 900 metres away, giving drivers travelling at 60mph more than 30 seconds to react.The new studs are also more durable, lasting up to five years longer than standard studs, require less maintenance during their lifetime and at only 4mm in height means are they safer for motorcycles.General enquiriesMembers of the public should contact the Highways England customer contact centre on 0300 123 5000.Media enquiriesJournalists should contact the Highways England press office on 0844 693 1448 and use the menu to speak to the most appropriate press officer. Highways England has installed more than 4,500 innovative solar road studs that harness sunlight in the daytime and light up the road at night, helping drivers stay safe.The beauty of these road studs is that they are also effective in heavy rain, mist or fog and a four-hour charge from daylight can power the devices for over 200 hours.The studs have been introduced as part of £8.5 million worth of improvements to journeys along the A38 between Ripley and junction 28 of the M1 near Mansfield – a stretch that is used by more than 23,000 vehicles every day.The improvements also include high visibility lane markings that make it easier for drivers at night or in adverse weather conditions, and coloured high friction surface that reduces the risk of skidding.Highways England project manager, Matthew Carruthers, said:last_img read more

Speech: Secretary of State Speech to the British-Irish Association Annual Conference

April 20, 2021

first_imgMedia queries should be directed to Bob Honey, NIO Communications Team, on 07956 579 286 ends – Since 1972 the BIA has played a key role in bringing together politicians, civil servants, academics, business people, faith leaders, journalist, commentators and many more to promote dialogue and understanding throughout these islands and to try and shape a better future together.So thank you for everything you have done and I am sure will continue to do in the years to come.This is of course my first BIA conference since the Prime Minister asked me to take on the role of Secretary of State for Northern Ireland in January, something that I had absolutely no hesitation in accepting.And as Secretary of State, I know what an amazing place Northern Ireland is and what it has to offer.Indeed, it’s not surprising that nearly all of my predecessors look back on their time with huge affection, with a number regarding it as the most rewarding and important job they ever had in government.So as I’ve gone out and about over the past nine months, meeting as many people as I can, it’s impossible not to be struck by the warmth of the place. Its beauty, its spirit and, yes, its history but also its massive potential.I’ve made a point of visiting with my family some of the great attractions that Northern Ireland has to offer: the Fermanagh lakes, the Giant’s Causeway, the Titanic Visitor attraction, to name but a few. And each time they can’t wait to come back for more.So Northern Ireland is a very special place, and I believe one with a great future.And this year of course we have been marking the 20th anniversary of the Belfast or Good Friday Agreement, an historic landmark in the history not just of Northern Ireland but of these islands as a whole.It was, as I said in April, a triumph of politics over the previous decades of violence, division and despair.Twenty years on it is perhaps easy for some to lose sight of the magnitude of what was achieved in 1998.So let me spell some them out.The constitutional position of Northern Ireland settled on the principle of consent.The Irish constitution amended to reflect that fact.Political institutions to accommodate and give expression to both the main traditions in Northern Ireland.Strong new bodies to foster greater North-South and East-West co-operation.Powerful protections for people’s rights, culture and identities.Reforms to make policing and the criminal justice system more accountable and acceptable across the community.And of course the consequences of all of this: a more peaceful, stable and prosperous Northern Ireland that is in so many ways unrecognisable since the dark days of the troubles, notwithstanding the severe threat we continue to face from dissident republicans.All of these gains were hard fought, the result of years of painstaking discussions and negotiations, and we should never forget just how precious they are or indeed shy away from making the case for the 1998 Agreement.It is our duty to do whatever is necessary to protect and defend it, and that is what this Government will continue to do.So let me reiterate for the avoidance of any doubt: the UK Government remains steadfast in its support for the Belfast Agreement, the bedrock on which the progress across the three interlocking relationships – within Northern Ireland, between Northern Ireland and Ireland and between the UK and Ireland – has been made over the past twenty years.We will do nothing that undermines this, including as the UK leaves the EU next March.And over recent years Northern Ireland has continued to take many great steps forward, not least on the economy.Unemployment, which in 2010 stood at just over 7 per cent, is now 3.8 per cent, one of the lowest figures on record and significantly below the EU average.Meanwhile employment, at just over 69 per cent, is at near record levels. In all, 63,000 more people are in work in Northern Ireland today than in 2010 … with nearly 19,000 new jobs in the past year. That’s more people with the security of a regular pay packet for them and their families.Average weekly earnings have grown at a faster rate in Northern Ireland than in any other UK region.There are over 12,000 more businesses than was the case 8 years ago.Over 900 overseas companies have invested in Northern Ireland, making it the most popular location for FDI outside of London and the South East – the highest number of FDI jobs per head of any part of the UK.Since 2011, exports are up by 11per cent, and external sales, including to the rest of the UK, are up 18 per cent.Tourism is booming, as anyone who has seen the cruise ships docked in Belfast this year will testify.We have more people staying for longer than ever before, with impressive new hotels to accommodate them and more in the pipeline.And of course next year the eyes of the world will once again be on Northern Ireland as the oldest and most famous golfing championship in the word, the Open, is played at Royal Portrush.None of this has happened by accident. It has been the result of the hard work of the people of Northern Ireland, with productivity increasing in Northern Ireland at a faster rate than in any other UK region.And, I might add, a fiscally responsible UK Government prepared to take the necessary measures and pursue policies at a national level to allow business and enterprise to thrive across the whole of the UK, with the result that we now have the lowest levels of unemployment across the country than at any time in over 40 years.A UK Government that despite severe pressures on public expenditure continues to recognise Northern Ireland’s special circumstances through generous support in the Block Grant.We have maintained public spending in Northern Ireland at around 20 per cent per head higher than the UK average.Over the current spending review period UK Government financial support to the Northern Ireland Executive has increased by 5 per cent in real terms.The Prime Minister’s recent pledge of an additional £20.5 billion to the NHS by 2024, which means an extra £760 million a year by 2023-24 for Northern Ireland under the Barnett formula.We’ve helped hard working people: some 745,000 people in Northern Ireland will have gained by an average of £182 as a result of our increases to the personal allowance and higher rate tax threshold.We’ve increased the National Living Wage to £7.83, delivering a £600 annual pay rise to full-time workers in Northern Ireland.And we’ve committed substantial additional security funding to help the PSNI tackle the continuing terrorist threat: £160 million over this spending review period and £230 million in the last one.These are just a few examples of how Northern Ireland has shared in our national economic recovery in recent years, and how Northern Ireland benefits from the strength and security of being part of the world’s fifth largest economy.Yet for all the successes there are significant challenges too.Economic growth in the past year has been flat, lower than the UK as a whole and in Ireland.Rates of economic inactivity remain higher than in other parts of the UK.Hospital waiting lists are longer than in England and are getting worse.There are other examples of where a current lack of ministerial decision making is holding Northern Ireland back.Corporation tax has yet to be devolved, meaning that Northern Ireland remains at an economic disadvantage when it comes to competing for foreign direct investment with Ireland.Construction projects worth up to £2bn are at risk due to the lack of key planning decisions, including plans for a new £30m quay for cruise ships, a new £175m transport hub for Belfast, a £280m power plant, the North-South electricity interconnector worth around £200m and a £50m office block at Belfast Harbour.Strategies for building a stronger society and a shared future, as well as tackling paramilitary activity, have lost momentum.And of course while I continue to ensure that Northern Ireland’s interests and needs are represented at the heart of Government, Northern Ireland would be better placed to meet the challenges and opportunities of Brexit with an Executive in place.In the absence of a devolved Executive we have brought forward measures at Westminster to ensure good governance and stability.In July the Government took a budget through Westminster to enable the continued delivery of public servicesAnd before the summer recess I announced plans to bring forward legislation enabling me to make key public appointments, for example to a reconstituted Policing Board.But none of this is any substitute for devolution – a locally elected Assembly and Executive taking decisions on behalf of all the people of Northern Ireland.And while I am not saying that a devolved government would solve all the problems I’ve just mentioned overnight, I am convinced that it could make a real difference to people’s lives and helping to unlock even further the undoubted and enormous potential that Northern Ireland has to offer.The absolute priority, therefore, for this Government – as I know it is the Irish Government – is to see a restoration of the devolved power sharing institutions at Stormont, and all the other related bodies, at the earliest opportunity.And yesterday in the House of Commons I set out a plan to try help bring that about.I announced that I intend to bring forward legislation that will provide for a limited and prescribed period in which there will be no legal obligation to set a date for an election.Importantly, during this time an Executive may be formed at any point without the requirement for further legislation. This will provide the opportunity to re-establish political talks aimed at restoring the Executive as soon as possible.The legislation I intend to introduce after the party conference recess will also include provisions to give greater clarity and certainty to enable NI departments to continue to take decisions in Northern Ireland in the public interest and to ensure the continued delivery of public services.I intend to consult parties in Northern Ireland over how this might best be done.I also intend, therefore, to use the next few weeks to engage in further discussions with the parties and the Irish Government, in accordance with the well-established three stranded approach with the intention of establishing a basis for moving into more formal political dialogue that leads to a restoration of the institutions.Finally, I also announced that I would be bringing forward a reduction in MLA pay.I believe that the people of Northern Ireland want to see a restoration of their political institutions and that is what this Government is committed to achieving.Stable and effective devolved government is the right thing for Northern Ireland.And I am in no doubt that it is best for the Union.last_img read more

Press release: It’s ofFISHal – 2019 Fishing licences feature bream, mirror carp and sea trout

April 20, 2021

first_imgRenowned angling and wildlife artist David Miller painted the images which will appear on the new Environment Agency issued fishing rod licences with the bream on the 2 rod coarse and trout licence, a mirror carp on the 3 rod licence and a sea trout on the salmon and migratory trout licence.Angling is one of the most popular participation sports in England. A million fishing licences were sold in 2017/2018 raising £23 million. In this last full year, sales of fishing licences funded 350,000 fish being restocked into rivers, responding to 797 fisheries incidents and installing 37 fish passes amongst other things.Bream is a fish which shoals in large numbers which makes them a traditional favourite of match anglers and can often make the difference between a poor and a good day for match anglers and pleasure anglers alike.Carp is now one of the most popular species amongst anglers and the mirror carp is actually the same species as the fully scaled Common Carp and its unusual scale pattern is the result of selective breeding over a considerable period of time.Sea trout is a migratory form of the native Brown Trout. Like the salmon, it migrates to the sea where it grows quickly before returning to spawn. A great many sea trout will survive spawning to return to the sea before coming back to its home river to spawn. It is not known why some trout migrate and others don’t.Kevin Austin, Deputy Director of Fisheries at the Environment Agency, said: Annual fishing licences are available from only £30 with fishing licence income used to fund work to maintain, improve and develop fisheries, fish stocks, fish habitats and angling. We’re delighted to reveal these new images as part of our continued drive to encourage people to give fishing a go. They celebrate three of our much loved fish species and we know that many anglers enjoy collecting these wonderful images. To enjoy fishing and make sure you fish legally just go to Gov.uklast_img read more

News story: NCGI success at the GSE Geography in Government Awards 2019

April 20, 2021

first_imgDGC’s personnel embedded within Defence Intelligence HQFor identifying the potential for bespoke very small-scale 3D perspective maps to provide MOD senior officers and Ministers with enhanced situational awareness for planning and policy purposesWhat is GSE Geography?In early 2018 a new cross-government geography profession was created within the family of the GSE profession, headed by a Senior Civil Servant supported by 11 deputy heads across the public sector.The MOD’s existing civilian Geospatial Analyst profession was aligned and renamed as the Defence Geography profession in April 2019. Most of its members work within the NCGI and the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO), and are being encouraged to also join the broader GSE Geography profession. Military personnel who are in geospatial-related roles are also eligible to join the new profession.GSE Geography has reached over 850 members in little over a year and is rapidly becoming a significant contributor to the development of the public sector’s new Analysis Function.Ian Spencer (NCGI Deputy Head for Foundation (NCGI-F) and Director Defence Geographic Centre (DGC) is one of the deputy heads of GSE Geography and is its lead within MOD.Job opportunities within NCGI can be found on Civil Service Jobs and Service Recruiting websites.Related Information Learn more about GSE Geography on their blog Follow GSE Geography on Twitter At the inaugural Government Science and Engineering (GSE) Geography in Government Awards on 25 April 2019, six nominations from the National Centre for Geospatial Intelligence (NCGI), part of Defence Intelligence (an organisation within the Joint Forces Command), were shortlisted. This is a notable recognition of our geospatial skills and contribution in a field of over 40 nominations from across the public sector.As part of the NCGI, the Defence Geographic Centre’s Learning and Development Team were announced as the winners of the award for “Contribution to the Profession”.The team has been instrumental in formulating and redesigning the MOD Geospatial Analyst Function Competence Framework, rebranding and enhancing it to align with the GSE Geography profession.The team also designed and delivered the Geospatial Managers Development Programme; a tailored course, designed to support the growth of GSE Geography within MOD by delivering development and professionalisation interventions for staff across a range of grades.Other NCGI successes in the shortlist were:Service personnel from 42 Engineer Regt (Geo) (part of the NCGI)For dedicating considerable personal time to teaching and inspiring the next generation of geographers at Comberton Village College through the ESRI Geo Mentoring Scheme.A team from Defence Geographic Centre (DGC)For developing and sustaining an international network of experts engaged in spatial socio-cultural developments, promoting the contribution of the profession, geospatial information principles and analysis techniques to understand and respond to complex problems.A team from DGCFor developing a “Country Insight” product, which is a country-wide situational awareness product providing foundation geospatial information about a range of key themes to provide context and understanding to defence users. It consists of a geodatabase of fully attributed data which can be manipulated or incorporated with other datasets to support wider analysis and assessment activities.A joint team from DGC and No 1 Aeronautical Information Documents Unit (No 1 AIDU) (also part of NCGI)For producing the first two Low Flying Charts to standardise the symbology across the 1:50,000, 1:250,000 and 1:500,000 scales to improve flight safety. Pilots and navigators now see standardised symbology across this range of air charts as they zoom in and out on their cockpit tablets, making the identification of obstructions and air space clearer. Join GSE Geography (select ‘geography’ in question 11)last_img read more

Costa director shortlisted for Women’s Award

April 20, 2021

first_imgCaroline Harris of Costa Coffee has been shortlisted for the Women’s 1st Shine Awards 2012.The coffee chain’s marketing director is one of five finalists in the Rising Star category, as part of the annual awards targeted at women across the hospitality, passenger transport, travel and tourism industries.Harris told British Baker: “Costa Enterprises is an increasingly exciting part of the Costa business to be involved in and I am really honoured to be shortlisted for this award.”The Rising Star Award will look to award one individual who is showing significant promise and developing quickly in their career.The four other finalists include Claire Jones of Flybe, Cassandra Leicester from Rolls-Royce, Lisa Mullaney of Indian restaurant Dishoom and learnpurple’s Emily Perry.An awards dinner will take place on 19 June, hosted by TV and radio presenter Emma Forbes, at Jumeirah Carlton Tower Hotel in Knightsbridge, London. The Women’s 1st Shine Awards are organised by People 1st, the sector skills council for hospitality, passenger transport, travel and tourism.last_img read more

Plans for Cornish pasty drive-thru

April 20, 2021

first_imgThe team who set up The West Cornwall Pasty Company has dreamed up a new retail bakery concept – a pasty drive-thru.Ken Cocking, his sons Arron and Gavin, and business partner Mark Christophers, are looking to transform an old garage on the outskirts of Helston in Cornwall, and have tasked architectural firm Laurence Associates to draw up plans for the building.The group is awaiting permission from the local council before it can transform the 2.25-acre site, worth £450,000. The team is looking to complete the project in the next 12 months.Cocking told local newspaper The West Briton: “We’ve been down to check it out and it lends itself perfectly to what we want. We liked the idea when we had the West Cornwall Pasty Company. Back then we sponsored the Helston Town Band and football club and held Cornish pasty taster sessions in London’s Covent Garden.“We got bored and thought, ‘Come on let’s have a go’. This isn’t just a bit of fun – we don’t play at things – but it’s all pie-in-the-sky until we get planning permission.”Four years ago, Cocking and his team sold The West Pasty Company in a management buyout worth £30m to private equity firm Gresham. Last month, the Helston-based pasty firm reported a £2.8m drop in turnover for the year ending 24 February 2012.last_img read more