Professor reviews Global Commons

January 26, 2021

first_imgQuestions of property and ownership are central to human history, and Leo Burke, director of Integral Leadership at the Mendoza College of Business and the Global Commons Initiative, said he believes the concept of common ownership will be increasingly important in the future. Burke gave a lecture entitled “Global Commons” as part of the “10 Years Hence” lecture series Friday in the Jordan Auditorium of the Mendoza College of Business. Burke said it was important to understand the idea of commons, goods and resources shared by communities for common benefit, in order to make informed decisions regarding global issues with major consequences. “The world 10 years from now is going to be dramatically different, you’ll barely recognize it,” Burke said. “One of the questions as a business school, as a university, as citizens that we have to face is: What kind of world do we want to unfold? Do we want a world that works for everyone? Do we want a world that is restricted?” Burke said the role of the commons in shaping this future lies in finding ways for the commons and the current capitalist, free-market system to work in concert. “Things that we share together are commons, things with historical laws and traditions of private ownership can be owned privately,” Burke said. “Some stuff we need to own, some stuff we can’t own and some stuff we need to talk about. The commons have characteristics that you might say complement the market. That will be important going forward. We have to be able to have commons structures that coexist with private property.” In explaining the concept of commons, Burke structured his presentation around five key words: ancient, diverse, commoning, stewardship and enclosure. He said the first two are attributes of commons – commons are ancient and diverse. He offered water as one example of an ancient commons, citing the Roman law of water usage under the Code of Justinian. As examples of the diversity among commons, he mentioned languages, family recipes, MIT’s open courseware, Linux and community gardens. Burke said the next word, commoning, is the action of sharing together in commons. He said the modern examples of commons demonstrate that commoning is found in collaborative efforts for common benefit. “People are finding common grounds to serve the common good,” Burke said. Stewardship relates to using commons and resources generally in a sustainable manner, he said. Burke said mankind uses 50 percent more of the world’s resources than it naturally produces each year. He said if humans continue on this trajectory of increasing resource consumption, the yearly usage will reach three worlds’ worth by the year 2050. Burke said humanity is more aware of this need for stewardship than ever before because technological advancement has increased mankind’s ability to monitor consumption. “This is the first time in human history when humanity can see itself in totality,” he said. The final word Burke discussed was enclosure. Burke said the term comes from the enclosure acts passed by Parliament during the Tudor period in England. Burke said, for his purposes, enclosure means privatizing commons. “Enclosure is the expropriation and commercialization of shared resources for personal gain,” he said. Burke said two current examples of enclosure are the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, as well as other efforts to extend copyright protections, and the 1981 patent on a microorganism awarded to General Electric. Burke said in the future it may be the case that water goes through the same process of being made a commodity rather than a commons. He said our modern way of thinking about property reflects this idea of enclosure. “We tend to think of enclosure as the only way to manage things,” he said. “Right now, if you can’t put a price on it, it doesn’t have value.” Contact Christian Myers atcmyers8@nd.edulast_img read more

Saint Mary’s to host first ever on-campus career fair

January 26, 2021

first_imgTags: Saint Mary’s Career Crossings Office, saint mary’s career fair Wednesday afternoon from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Saint Mary’s will host its first ever on-campus career fair in Rice Commons. Stacie Jeffirs, director of the Career Crossings Office said Wednesday’s fair would host the largest group of employers the Career Crossings Office had ever brought together on the College’s campus.“We have employers from all different industries looking for full time, internship and summer opportunities,” she said. “The employers are nonprofit, for profit and from all different industries.”Jeffirs said the fair is open to all Saint Mary’s, Holy Cross and Notre Dame students and is intended for all majors and all class years. First-years are strongly encouraged to come to experience a professional setting, she said. Jeffirs stressed that students who had attended Notre Dame’s career fair earlier in the year should still consider attending this Wednesday.“You should take advantage of all opportunities to meet with different employers, regardless of what time of year it is,” she said. “We wanted to have ours a little bit later in the semester to give students who didn’t go to Notre Dame’s fair another opportunity. We wanted to do one that was a little bit smaller a little bit more focused on the employers who we have more relationships with. It is a smaller more intimate career fair. “I’m hoping that by hosting it at Saint Mary’s, it will feel a little less intimidating,” she said. “We also didn’t want to front load everything at the beginning of the year.”Jeffirs said that the Saint Mary’s career fair is meant to supplement — not replace — Notre Dame’s Fall Career Expo.“We still have a really good relationship with the Notre Dame [Fall Career Expo], and we will continue to promote those opportunities,” she said. “We’ve been getting the requests from students to have our own career and internship fair, so this year we just said let’s make this happen. We decided to take a leap and do it and see what we can add on to it this year.”James Stano, assistant director of the Careers Crossings Office, stressed that students should come to the career fair prepared and should research the organizations and companies extensively.He said one of the benefits of the College’s career fair is that it will provide a smaller forum for students to talk with potential employers.“You’ll be able to spent more time talking with employers,” he said. “Part of Saint Mary’s institution is much more intimate in the work that we do. They won’t have as many people to remember.”last_img read more

Occupy Wall Street Marks 3rd Anniversary, Warms Up For Epic Climate March

December 18, 2020

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Occupy Wall Street protest organizers commemorated the third anniversary of the global anti-Wall Street corruption, et al movement September 17 not by overrunning the streets of Lower Manhattan alongside tens of thousands of supporters or by staging mass acts of civil disobedience as they’ve done since the movement’s birth in 2011, but by quietly strategizing for this year’s primary action events: September 21’s People’s Climate March and September 22’s “Flood Wall Street.” A handful of OWS organizers led by Sumumba Sobukwe of OWS working group Occu Evolve rallied several dozen protestors and ran workshops throughout the day in a sparsely populated Zuccotti Park, the movement’s historic home base in the shadow of One World Trade Center just blocks from Wall Street itself. Holding signs, chanting “We are the 99 Percent!” and distributing fliers about several upcoming marches, they spoke out about issues ranging from police brutality and income inequality to Native American rights and corporate corruption under the watchful eye of the New York City Police Department, who operated a mobile command post nearby and set up barricades throughout the financial district. Officials in both white and blue uniforms patrolled the park, guarded intersections throughout Lower Manhattan and also stood ground outside many of the financial institutions OWS has criticized. “Not all of us are anarchists,” Sobukwe told the Press while handing out “Occupy The Media: Public Press” lanyards to dozens of news outlets and journalists who’d converged on Zuccotti that morning (outnumbering the activists) to cover the anniversary. “Not all of us are these quote-unquote crazy people. We really just wanted Occupy Wall Street to be a movement like the anti-Vietnam movement, like the Civil Rights movement, or more. We felt like the movement needed to evolve.“Mic check!” he boomed from the south steps of the park a few moments later—signaling supporters to activate the “People’s Microphone,” whereby all those within earshot loudly echo whatever the main speaker says. “We’re still here!” Sobukwe declared, amid a chorus of the same. “We may not be thousands, but we’re still strong. And we’re still here. Because Wall Street is still here. Committing the same crimes. Against the same people. Which are us.”Programs included independent media workshops, meet and greets, networking sessions, discussions and teach-ins including: “Occupy The Environment: Saving Our Climate;” “Stop Mass Incarceration: From Eric Garner to Michael Brown and Beyond;” “End the Militarization of Police” and a “People’s and Workers Assembly for the 99%.” These were warm-up preparations for “Flood Wall Street,” a massive collective act of nonviolent civil disobedience slated for Monday, September 22, beginning at 9 a.m. at Battery Park to coincide with the United Nations Climate Summit on September 23. From there, protestors will march and “flood” the steps of the New York Stock Exchange at noon in a massive sit-in, according to floodwallstreet.net. “Stop Capitalism. End the Climate Crisis,” declares a message on the site. “Flood, blockade, sit-in, and shut down the institutions that are profiting from the climate crisis. Wear blue.”The mass OWS action comes on the heels of what is slated to be the largest march against climate change in history—the People’s Climate March—on Sunday, September 21 in New York City. Steve Yip, an organizer associated with the nonprofit Stop Mass Incarceration Network, stressed on Wednesday the impact OWS had on “changing the discourse” about a spectrum of injustices, vowing that October would be the “Month of Resistance” replete with “nationwide walkouts” and the 19th Annual Day of Protest Against Police Brutality, Repression and the Criminalization of a Generation on October 22. “It is mass genocide!” shouted Yip, also from the south steps of Zuccotti. “No school. No work. Walk out!”Occupy Wall Street protestor Bill Johnson lashes out about income inequality, homelessness and sub-par Superstorm Sandy recovery efforts outside Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan Sept. 17, 2014 during the global protest movement’s third anniversary. (Christopher Twarowski/Long Island Press)Self-described radical journalist, political analyst and OWS organizer Caleb Maupin told supporters that when some of his friends and colleagues heard it was OWS’ third anniversary, they responded with something along the lines of “That’s so three years ago.” Yet, he stressed, the very same injustices which helped spark the movement still persist today. “There are still a group of businesses that are making profits from destroying our lives!” he howled. “They can’t make profits by exploiting us! So now they make profits by locking us up!”In addition to corporate greed and mass incarceration, Maupin railed against the World Business Forum—a mass gathering of business elite to be held October 7 and 8 at Radio City Music Hall that will feature speakers including former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke—and urged all to “March against capitalism!”“We may not be in Zuccotti Park anymore,” he declared. “But we’re everywhere!”“We’re still here!” he continued. “We are the 99 percent!”That message was echoed by Robert Hernandez, also of OWS’ Occu Evolve. “Even though our numbers have dropped dramatically, we’re still here,” he told the Press prior to his turn on the People’s Mic. “We’re not giving up.”“We’ve been here three years now and we’re going to be here another three years and longer,” he vowed. “Don’t give up! Never give up!”“I’m a refugee in my own country,” lamented Willy Underbaggage of the Lakota Nation, who took the People’s Mic next. “The Earth is being ravaged. Stolen. Used. To control you. “Wall Street has done so much damage here across this land,” he continued. “Wall Street was created to thrive, to steal from indigenous people!”Occupy Wall Street protestor/figure skater/performance artist/attorney Marni Halasa threatens to give bad bankers a spanking in commemoration of the global protest movement’s third anniversary Sept. 17, 2014 in Lower Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park. (Christopher Twarowski/Long Island Press)Double-gold US Figure Skating champion, performance artist, unofficial OWS Freedom Fairy, OWS Alternative Banking working group member and attorney Marni Halasa, dressed in a skintight police costume and pretending to club jailed bad bankers with a baton (one was a handcuffed blowup doll) equated Fordham University law professor Zephyr Teachout as living proof that OWS was still alive and well, citing her David-Vs-Goliath Democratic gubernatorial primary challenge against Gov. Andrew Cuomo—which was unsuccessful, but garnered the highest percentage of the vote against an incumbent since the primary’s were introduced in 1970.“[Her campaign is] one way Occupy is still very, very relevant,” she explained to the crowd. “So if anybody said that Occupy is not relevant, we are.”“Zephyr Teachout’s campaign was one of the most exciting things that has happened in politics in years,” Halasa told the Press afterward. “And what I love about her is she takes an examination of sort of the existing power structures—like who has power in society? Why do we allow Citibank and Chase Manhattan to allocate credit? You need credit in order to have a small business and actually succeed.“You don’t hear Cuomo talk about that, you don’t really hear mainstream politicians talk about examining the power relationships in society,” she continued.“The system is fkd up!” slammed a speaker introduced as “Brother Bill.” “It needs to be changed.”Sporting a scruffy salt-and-pepper beard, he directed people to greenscissors.com, a campaign to identify and eliminate environmentally wasteful and harmful projects. The group’s 2012 report found that ending environmentally destructive federal programs would save nearly $700 billion, according to the site.“We’re marching against Wall Street and for Main Street,” he added, an accordion player taking the mic shortly after and belting out a song “about the estate tax.”“The Occupy movement is a spiritual movement,” OWS protestor Hermes Levi told the crowd through a think West African accent. “The Occupy movement wanted to make a better world.“Occupy cannot die because it’s the idea whose time has come,” he explained to the Press afterward. “The time is now. Whether it’s three people, five people, 100 people, but I say it’s about understanding…people will get it sooner or later, and once they get it, it will start…the same tactics used to win the battle will not work, so Occupy cannot die, it can only rise up again.”“The three-year anniversary and things that are happening everywhere shows that Occupy is still here,” continued Levi. “It’s not the same strength because of what happened [police and government crackdowns and its eviction from Zuccotti], but this is how history works: It’s two step forwards, one step back.“We want a better world,” he added. “The journalists come and ask us ‘What are your demands?’ We say we don’t have no demand, we want to change the world. We want to change ourselves. We ask nothing from you. So changing ourselves and changing the world is not easy, but it’s feasible, it’s plausible.”“Occupy Wall Street: From Zuccotti Park to Times Square, The Revolution Spreads” [Press Multimedia Cover Story Package Oct. 20. 2011]last_img read more

Long Island Snow Storm Forecast to Snarl Monday Commute

December 16, 2020

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A winter storm is forecast to dump up to five inches of snow and ice across much of Long Island, likely snarling the Monday morning rush hour commute, experts say.The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for northern Nassau and northwestern Suffolk counties, where two to five inches is expected, and a winter storm advisory for southern Nassau, southern Suffolk and the Twin Forks, where one one to four inches of snow is predicted. Both the warning and the advisory are in effect from 7 p.m. Sunday to 6 p.m. Monday.“I am urging all New Yorkers to exercise caution when traveling,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. “I encourage all New Yorkers to plan ahead for delays and remain safe throughout the storm.”The flakes are forecast to start falling early Monday morning before the storm is expected to change into mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain before noon. The storm is likely to cause travel delays across the tri-state area.Temperatures are forecast to be in the high 20s and low 30s with wind chills as low as the teens when the storm hits, which is expected to cause icy road conditions through the Monday evening rush hour commute.Once the storm passes, Tuesday is forecast to be sunny in the 20s before a slight chance of snow showers moves in Wednesday into Thursday. Next weekend is so far forecast as partly cloudy in the 20s with another slight chance of snow next Sunday.last_img read more

Authorities assure safety as locals protest burial of people with coronavirus

October 19, 2020

first_imgBanyumas Regent Achmad Husein even went as far as to help in the digging to show residents that as long as the corpse had been handled properly, the dead body of a COVID-19 patient was not dangerous.”In the near future, we’ll educate residents so they understand that the virus dies underground and it won’t spread everywhere and infect people,” Husein said as quoted by tribunnews.com on Wednesday.Similar tensions have been reported in Depok and Tasikmlaya in West Java, Bandar Lampung in Lampung and Gowa regency in South Sulawesi.Ganjar said he himself had asked experts about the protocol for handling the dead bodies of people with COVID-19.The safety protocols include that hospital authorities treating the patient spray disinfectant on the corpse, wash the body, cover it in plastic and put it inside a coffin for the burial.”If the bodies are handled according to the guidelines […] they will not spread the disease. It’s safe, the virus will be dead, too,” Ganjar said, “The most important thing is that residents should not attend the funeral.”Following the protests, the Banyumas administration prepared three plots of land as a graveyard specifically designated for COVID-19 patients and suspects.Read also: Viral video shows Southeast Sulawesi family unwrapping body of suspected COVID-19 fatalitySouth Sulawesi also took a similar action after locals rejected the idea of burying three COVID-19 suspects in the provincial capital of Makassar on Sunday and Tuesday.”The South Sulawesi administration has prepared a special graveyard for COVID-19 patients and suspects so such incidents won’t occur again in the future. The graveyard can be used starting on Wednesday,” medical department head of Hasanuddin Military Command Col. Ckm. Dr. Soni Endro Cahyo Wicaksono said on Tuesday.Husni Thamrin, public health department head of the South Sulawesi Health Agency, said his side would continue to educate people so the latter understood that all COVID-19 patients and suspects were buried in accordance with WHO guidelines.As of Wednesday afternoon, Indonesia has recorded 1,677 confirmed coronavirus cases with 157 fatalities, making the country’s mortality rate of 9.3 percent among the highest in the world. (nal)Topics : Authorities across some regions are trying hard to assure the public that the burial of people with COVID-19 is not something to be wary of, as reports emerged that some locals have rejected the idea of having the bodies of deceased persons infected by the novel coronavirus buried in cemeteries near their homes.Central Java Governor Ganjar Pranowo said he was “deeply saddened by the reports”, emphasizing that all burials of those with or suspected to have contracted COVID-19 in the country had followed the safety standards of the World Health Organization (WHO).”I don’t want such a thing to happen again. Let’s respect the feelings of the family members of the deceased,” he said on Wednesday, “They are already in so much grief as they were not able to see the faces of the deceased one last time.” “So, please don’t hurt them [the family members] more. Let’s support them together.”Read also: Alone on their deathbed, how COVID-19 keeps families away from loved onesOn Tuesday, the dead body of a COVID-19 patient that had been buried in Tumiyeng village in the province’s Banyumas regency was dug up to be removed to another cemetery following protests.Four villages previously rejected the idea having the dead body buried in a local cemetery, as they were reportedly concerned about possible coronavirus transmission.last_img read more

Wanyama leaves Tottenham for Montreal Impact

September 22, 2020

first_imgRelatedPosts Liverpool sign Portugal winger Jota from Wolves EPL: Liverpool open title defence against underdogs Matuidi quits Juventus Victor Wanyama’s Tottenham career has come to an end, with the midfielder opting to join Thierry Henry at Montreal Impact. The 28-year-old came close to leaving during the summer transfer window and again in January, having struggled to regain his place in the starting line-up after a string of injury troubles. Wanyama has now called time on his spell in north London, just shy of four years after arriving from Southampton, with a move to Major League Soccer. Tottenham wrote on Twitter: “We have reached agreement with Montreal Impact for the transfer of VictorWanyama. “We wish Victor all the best for the future.” The club added a video of some of Wanyama’s most memorable goals for the club, including his memorable pile driver in a 2-2 draw at Liverpool in 2018. The accompanying message read: “From the goal in our last game at White Hart Lane to THAT strike at Anfield, thank you for providing us with some incredible memories Victor Wanyama.”— Tags: AnfieldMajor League SoccerMontreal ImpactVictor Wanyamalast_img read more

Aguero taking risk-free approach

September 20, 2020

first_img Aguero was a substitute for the first two matches last season but went on to score 32 goals in 41 appearances. The Argentina forward told the club’s website, www.mcfc.co.uk: “Whether I start or not remains to be seen. I’m trying to get there and be in top condition, but arriving for pre-season later having taken part in the Copa America with Argentina means I need some additional time. “With the whole season in mind, what matters the most is that I get in top form and don’t take any risks.” Sergio Aguero is not taking any shortcuts as he bids to prove his fitness for Manchester City’s clash with champions Chelsea on Sunday. City’s star striker played only the final 27 minutes of Monday’s season-opening 3-0 Barclays Premier League win at West Brom on Monday. As he did last year, manager Manuel Pellegrini is easing the 27-year-old back into action after international duty during the summer. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Manuel Pellegrini hopeful of peaceful return to Villa for Fabian Delph

September 20, 2020

first_img Delph angered fans when he abruptly quit Villa Park in July just weeks after issuing a strong statement pledging his future to the midlands outfit. The 25-year-old has featured little for City since because of injuries but is now back in contention and could feature at Villa Park on Sunday. Pellegrini said: “Of course it will be good for Fabian to play for England. He played some minutes in Seville and maybe he will play some more on Sunday. So, it is good for him to have minutes and good for the national squad also.” City, the Barclays Premier League leaders, take on a Villa side struggling at the bottom of the table but potentially lifted by the arrival of new manager Remi Garde this week. Pellegrini said: “I don’t know who said it was going to be easy. For me there are no easy games in the Premier League. “They are at the bottom of the table with a new manager so the motivation to try not to be relegated will be high. “It is very important to repeat what we did against Sevilla in the Champions League and not to think that because we played well in the last game we can do it in exactly the same way.” The game will also see City come up against former defender Micah Richards for the first time since he left the club in the summer. Former City youth product Richards was a star of the 2012 title win but then fell down the pecking order after a succession of injuries and moved on after a one-season loan at Fiorentina. Pellegrini said: “Micah was a very unfortunate player. He was a very important player because he was a young player here, but he had so many injuries in the one season he was with me.” Manchester City manager Manuel Pellegrini claims Fabian Delph does not deserve to be booed on his return to Aston Villa this weekend. Asked if Delph could expect a difficult welcome, Pellegrini said: “No, I hope he will not receive that. He played a lot of years for Aston Villa and Aston Villa wanted to sell him also. “He continued being a player that gave a lot of his career to Aston Villa and I don’t think the fans will forget all those things.” Delph, then Villa captain, was heavily linked with City at the end of last season but he appeared to rule out a move when he spoke out to “set the record straight” and say, “I’m not leaving”. He then performed a volte-face to join City in an £8million deal and, with hamstring issues now behind him, Pellegrini claims he will not lack motivation this weekend. The Chilean said: “Maybe it is the same as with Jesus Navas when we played against Sevilla. “Fabian made (a lot of) his career at Aston Villa but he is a professional player, now he is playing with us. I know that he wants to play also because he was a long time injured.” Delph was first injured during City’s pre-season tour of Australia and then made only two appearances before suffering a fresh setback on international duty with England in September. After another 13 games out he returned as a substitute during the midweek Champions League win at Sevilla and has been called up for England’s upcoming friendlies against Spain and France. Press Associationlast_img read more

Men’s Basketball: Way too early Big Ten rankings for 2020-2021 basketball season

September 16, 2020

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team finished the season scorching hot, winning eight conference straight games that gave the Badgers a share of the regular-season Big Ten title, their first since the 2014-2015 season.Though the COVID-19 pandemic forced the 2019-2020 season to end abruptly, Badger fans have a lot to look forward to when basketball tips off next November. With only one senior graduating and a loaded recruiting class, the Badgers look equipped for another conference championship run.UW Athletics: Sports you can do while stuck in quarantineWith the COVID-19 pandemic leaving us all trapped inside during self-isolation and quarantine, it can be difficult to stay sane. Read…Today, we compare how Wisconsin stacks up compared to the rest of the Big Ten for the 2020-2021 season. 1. Iowa (20-11, 11-9 Big Ten in 2019-2020)Assuming John R. Wooden Award winner Luka Garza returns for his senior season, the 2020-2021 Hawkeye team will be the most talented in Head Coach Fran McCaffery’s 10-year tenure. Alongside Garza, the Hawkeyes return guards CJ Fredrick and Joe Wieskamp, who both averaged 10-plus points during the 2019-2020 season. If the NCAA grants senior sharpshooter Jordan Bohannon a medical redshirt, the Hawkeyes would be a seasoned team that should have Final Four aspirations.2. Wisconsin (21-10, 14-6)With seven of their eight rotation players returning, the Badgers have a lot of experience that puts them on track for back-to-back conference championships. Forwards Micah Potter and Nate Reuvers have both shown flashes of being great big men in the Big Ten. Combine that with a senior backcourt of Brad Davison, D’Mitrik Trice and Aleem Ford, and the Badgers’ experience will help them compete for another Big Ten title.3. Michigan State (22-9, 14-6)Despite losing former conference player of the year, Cassius Winston, the Spartans return a strong core if forward Xavier Tillman decides to return for his senior season. Rocket Watts and Aaron Henry are dynamic players on the wing and the addition of former Marquette standout Joey Hauser will provide another scoring option for the Spartans.Men’s Basketball: Looking back on Wisconsin’s roller-coaster seasonThe University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team’s 2019-20 season was a rollercoaster in the truest sense of the word. While Read…4. Illinois (21-10, 13-7)For Illinois, the expectations for 2020-2021 rely heavily on the decision of hometown star Ayo Dosunmu. If Dosunmu decides to return, the Illini will not only be conference championship contenders but will also have a chance to make their first Final Four since the 2004-2005 season. Regardless of Dosunmu’s decision, Illinois will return 2019-2020 Big Ten Freshman of the Year Kofi Cockburn, the Big Ten’s best rim protector inside.5. Ohio State (21-10, 11-9)Despite the departures of Kaleb and Andre Wesson, the Buckeyes will reload in 2020-2021 with a strong recruiting class and transfers that can contribute right away for Head Coach Chris Holtmann. A player to watch will be senior transfer Seth Towns. Towns chose the Buckeyes over the likes of blue-bloods such as Duke and averaged 16 points per game for Harvard last year. Only time will tell if Towns’ dominant play will translate to the Big Ten.6. Indiana (20-12, 9-11)The Hoosiers return virtually the same rotation in 2020 and will hope for freshman Trayce Jackson-Davis to take the next step and become an All-Conference player. With the addition of three players ranked in the top 150 of the 2020 recruiting class, the Hoosiers should make their first NCAA Tournament under Head Coach Archie Miller in 2021.7. Rutgers (20-11, 11-9)With a breakout 2019-2020 season that shocked just about everybody, the Scarlet Knights put the Big Ten on notice and were set to make their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1991. Rutgers returns guards Ron Harper Jr. and Geo Baker and the dynamic duo will once again be difficult for opposing defenses to stop in 2020.Men’s Basketball: Constructing Wisconsin’s team for 21st centuryWhile the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball team was robbed of a potential deep NCAA Tournament run in the 2019-2020 Read…8. Michigan (19-21, 10-10)Though Michigan loses Zavier Simpson and potentially Isaiah Livers to the draft, the Wolverines will likely be in the NCAA Tournament field come 2021. A top-ten recruiting class and the addition of graduate transfer Mike Smith will have Head Coach Juwan Howard’s team primed to compete in the Big Ten.9. Maryland (24-7, 14-6)While it may be a surprise that the Terrapins are ranked this low, Mark Turgeon’s team faces the difficulty of replacing Anthony Cowan and Jalen Smith, who were both named to the Coaches All-Big Ten first team. The Terrapins return a solid core led by six-foot-six-inch guard Aaron Wiggins, but many experts question whether that core will be enough to contend in a loaded Big Ten.10. Minnesota (15-16, 8-12)It will be a big year for Minnesota and Head Coach Richard Pitino. In seven years, Pitino has just two NCAA tournament appearances and a 48-82 conference record. With the loss of Daniel Oturu, Pitino will have to rely on junior guards Marcus Carr and Gabe Kalscheur in hope of a bounce-back season.11. Purdue (16-15, 9-11)The Boilers were much better than their 16-15 record indicated in 2019-2020, with wins over Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa and Michigan State. The loss of defensive anchor Matt Haarms to BYU will be tough for Head Coach Matt Painter’s team, but look for junior Trevion Williams to become a low-post presence with added minutes for a Boilermaker team that will likely float around the bubble throughout next season.Men’s Basketball: Could Badgers really have captured 2020 national title?In a strange, unofficial end to the 2020 Wisconsin men’s basketball season, ESPN’s Basketball Power Index christened the Badgers as Read…12. Nebraska (7-25, 2-18)The Huskers won just two conference games in 2019-2020, but they’ll bring in key players that will contribute right away for Head Coach Fred Hoiberg’s team. With the addition of Western Illinois guard Kobe Foster and former Badger guard Kobe King, the Huskers will be much more competitive in 2020.13. Penn State (21-10, 11-9)Following the loss of standout Lamar Stevens and frontcourt leader Mike Watkins, the Nittany Lions are faced with a difficult challenge of replacing a roster filled with mostly upperclassmen. After a tremendous 2019-2020, expect Penn State to be back toward the bottom of the Big Ten in the 2020-2021 season.14. Northwestern (8-23, 3-17)Northwestern returns key contributors in Miller Kopp and Boo Buie, but the Wildcats are still a year or two away from taking the next step in competing for an NCAA Tournament berth. Expect the Wildcats to be better, but still finish toward the bottom of the Big Ten.last_img read more

Pat Lam to leave Connacht at the end of the season

September 9, 2020

first_imgLam has described the decision to leave as “one of the most difficult I’ve had to make in my life” but says he is proud to pass on the baton knowing that Connacht “is truly seen as one of four strong provinces of Irish rugby.”Connacht CEO Willie Ruane has paid tribute to Lam and says they “remain extremely confident and excited about the future.”He also confirmed that they will begin talks with the IRFU immediately to start the process of recruiting Lam’s replacement.Lam made no reference to his future after Saturday’s bonus point win over Treviso, and instead spoke of having more of his players fit heading into the Christmas period. Connacht have announced the departure of head coach Pat Lam at the end of the season.Lam is leaving the club to take up a new role as head coach of English Premiership side Bristol next summer.The New Zealand native is in his fourth year at Connacht and famously led them to their first Guinness Pro 12 title last season.last_img read more